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Work Values Assessment (Chart 3)

Transition Planning Assessment AreasWhat are we AssessingHow can you assess it and how can you access the suggested data collection or assessment sources?
Cell 9: Attitudes/ Habits/Self Awareness for Postsecondary ExpectationsWork ethics/ values Review student files or portfolios to see if any information related to work ethics and/or work/values have been documented from any previous assessment effort, community-based experiences, or from work history information.
Interview student to elicit awareness of self in relation to work ethics and values needed for working. Interview format may include direct questions related to things that are important about being a worker and values related to working and earning an income. As an advanced organizer for the student, consider using Values Inventory, a self-rating scale from Employment and Career Planning: Informal Assessments for Transition (ECP-IAT), pp. 46-49. This rating scale is an informal self-assessment that covers a variety of values/attitudes associated with working and lifestyle.

ECP-IAT (Synatschk, Clark, Patton, & Copeland, 2007) is published by PRO-ED, Inc., 8700 Shoal Creek Blvd., Austin, TX 78757, www.proedinc.com
Conduct classroom observations to provide information on the importance of work to the student, student’s approach to learning tasks, demonstrating knowledge or skills, and demonstrated values toward doing his/her best, following rules, goal orientation, honesty, task commitment, and meeting standards of attendance and punctuality.
Conduct worksite observations of students in current work situations. Document observations of work ethics and values. Consider using the Work Habit Observations.
Conduct teacher interviews and/or review input from general and special education teachers on student work ethics and values related to school tasks and responsibilities. Consider using Vocational Behavior, a teacher checklist from Employment and Career Planning: Informal Assessments for Transition (ECP-IAT), pp. 96-97. This checklist is an informal teacher assessment that covers a variety of values/habits/attitudes.

ECP-IAT (Synatschk, Clark, Patton, & Copeland, 2007) is published by PRO-ED, Inc., 8700 Shoal Creek Blvd., Austin, TX 78757, www.proedinc.com
Complete (or review) a work history record on the student to establish previous work experience and the work ethics and values demonstrated.
Interview current and/or previous employers to obtain information on the student’s demonstration of work ethics/values
Collect and review employer worksite evaluations of students currently in work situations.

Two examples of employer worksite evaluation forms are: Worksite Evaluation Form and Employee Evaluation Form. Themes related to Cell 9 work ethics/attitudes are also covered in Cell 6 employer evaluation forms.
Administer Work Personality Profile from Informal Assessments for Transition Planning (IATP), pp. 67-68. A school work experience coordinator, a job coach, or an employer/supervisor may complete the scale.

IATP (Clark, Patton, & Moulton, 2000) is published by PRO-ED, Inc., 8700 Shoal Creek Blvd., Austin, TX 78757, www.proedinc.com
Administer “Satisfactions” You Need, a checklist from Employment and Career Planning: Informal Assessments for Transition (ECP-IAT), p. 51. This checklist is an informal self-assessment that covers a variety of job skills/habits/attitudes.

ECP-IAT (Synatschk, Clark, Patton, & Copeland, 2007) is published by PRO-ED, Inc., 8700 Shoal Creek Blvd., Austin, TX 78757, www.proedinc.com
Administer selected subscales from BRIGANCE® Employability Skills Inventory. Select appropriate tests or informal assessments related to work ethics, values, and attitudes. Available at www.curriculumassociates.com
Use of self advocacy skills Review student files or portfolios to see if any information related to using self advocacy skills has been documented from any previous assessment effort
Interview student to elicit awareness of self in relation to using self advocacy skills needed for successful working. Interview format may be brief with direct questions related to things that are important about knowing one’s accommodation needs, asking for accommodations, using accommodations when provided, and seeking assistance for special needs.
Conduct teacher interviews and/or review input from general and special education teachers on student use of self advocacy skills.
Complete (or review) a work history record on the student to establish previous work experience
Interview current and/or previous employers to obtain information on the student’s demonstration of self advocacy skills.
Collect and review employer worksite evaluations of students currently in work situations. Focus on items related to self advocacy skills, such as requesting accommodations, using accommodations, and seeking assistance for special needs.

Two examples of employer worksite evaluation forms are: Worksite Evaluation Form and Employee Evaluation Form. Themes related to Cell 9 self advocacy skills are also addressed in Cell 6 employer evaluation forms.
Conduct worksite observations of students in current work situations. Document evidence of use of self advocacy skills.
Administer the AIR Self-Determination Scale to the student and/or parent(s). There is also a form for school respondents to complete to compare with students’ and parents’ responses or in lieu of being able to have students and/or parents complete the form. The AIR Self-Determination scale:
  • produces a profile of the student's level of self-determination
  • identifies areas of strength and areas needing improvement
  • identifies specific educational goals that can be incorporated into the student's IEP
The AIR assessments measure two broad components—capacity and opportunity. Capacity refers to the students’ knowledge, abilities, and perception that enable them to be self-determined. Opportunity refers to the students’ chances to use their knowledge and abilities.

The AIR Self-Determination Scale is available for you to use, free of charge. Download the manual and each scale by clicking here.
Administer the Arc Self-Determination Scale. The Arc's Self-Determination Scale (Wehmeyer, 1995) is a student self-report measure of self-determination designed for use by adolescents with disabilities, particularly students with mild cognitive and learning disabilities. The 72-item scale measures overall self-determination and the domain areas of autonomy, self-regulation, psychological empowerment, and self-realization. The student may complete the scale independently or it can be read to the student. The scale can be administered to 15 students at one time, provided students' reading abilities warrant this and there are enough persons to provide necessary support to students during scale administration. For further information on The Arc's Self-Determination Scale contact The Arc of the United States, 500 East Border Street, Suite 300, Arlington, TX 76010. Telephone: 817/261-6003. This scale may also be accessed through the University of Kansas’ Beach Center on Disability web site.
Complete the Citizenship and Legal Skills rating scale from Independent Living and Community Participation: Informal Assessments for Transition, p. 36

ILCP (Synatschk, Clark, & Patton, 2008) is published by PRO-ED, Inc., 8700 Shoal Creek Blvd., Austin, TX 78757, www.proedinc.com